Las Mornings
In Focus

LAS In Focus launched in February, 2015 and provides a look at the most talked-about exhibitions on the London gallery scene. It’s the insider’s guide to the art on view in London. Each term we select the museum or gallery shows we think people will be talking about, and lecturers will discuss the background to the art and point out highlights not to be missed when seeing the exhibition itself.

The lectures begin at 10am, and will finish by noon; coffee and light refreshments are provided, and this lecture series takes place at either the Berkeley Hotel or the Bulgari Hotel, London.

Three American Johns: John Singer Sargent, Jasper Johns and Jean-Michel Basquiat

Thursday 28th September

Three American Johns: John Singer Sargent, Jasper Johns and Jean-Michel Basquiat

There’s been a strong focus on American art in London in 2017, which continues throughout the autumn season. Dulwich Picture Gallery will hold an exhibition dedicated to John Singer Sargent and his work, which provides a wonderful excuse to start our day’s lecture in the mid 19th Century. The Royal Academy will, no doubt, be receiving great reviews for its retrospective of Jasper Johns – which will complement the exhibition on Rauschenberg, at Tate, earlier this year. Finally, the Barbican will have the most important Basquiat show in the UK since the artist died at the age of 27, in 1988. Too young to be the father of graffiti art, Basquiat might well be considered to be its older brother. All three “John’s” will be the subject of Dr Richard Stemp’s exploration into what it means to be an “American” artist.

 

Lecturer
Dr. Richard Stemp
Date:
Thursday 28th September 2017
Time:
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Address
The Bulgari Hotel,
171, Knightsbridge, SW7 1DW
Cost:
£75.00
Book Tickets
Objects and Absences: Duchamp, Dalí, and Whiteread

Tuesday 17th October

Objects and Absences: Duchamp, Dalí, and Whiteread

All three of our artists today have attempted something completely and utterly new. Duchamp, initially inspired by the complexity of cubism and the driving energy of futurism, tried to change the art world by exhibiting objects he hadn’t made and in so doing, created a new form of art as a result – the “readymade”. Dalí changed our expectations in different ways, by subverting our perception through unlikely confrontations of form – but like Duchamp, he invited us to see familiar objects in different ways. Rachel Whiteread, on the other hand, is effectively the opposite of Duchamp. Rather than presenting us with readymade objects, she shows us forgotten spaces, voids we never see and would not consider, giving life to the gaps behind books and under the bath, and creating echoes of uninhabited rooms. She reminds us of the power of the objects we do not see and leads us to imagine the lives of those now gone. The first two artists are brought together this autumn in an unexpected and groundbreaking exhibition at the Royal Academy, whist the third will be enjoying a major retrospective at Tate Britain. When considered together they will help us to consider what is – or for that matter isn’t – necessary to make a work of art.

 

Lecturer
Dr. Richard Stemp
Date:
Tuesday 17th October 2017
Time:
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Address
The Bulgari Hotel,
171, Knightsbridge, SW7 1DW
Cost:
£75.00
Book Tickets
Early Modernism: Matisse and Cézanne

Tuesday 7th November

Early Modernism: Matisse and Cézanne

Late autumn will be the ideal time to get to grips with some of the most important developments in modern art in the late 19thand early 20th centuries, with three exhibitions exploring the developments of Impressionism, Post Impressionism and beyond. Tate Britain will consider the impact which British Art had on the nascent Impressionist movement, as Monet and Pissarro, among others, travelled to London to avoid the Franco-Prussian war in 1870-71. Although Cézanne exhibited at the first Impressionist exhibition three years later, in 1874, and again at the third in 1877, it wasn’t until he found his own voice that he began to be acclaimed rather than maligned. The National Portrait Gallery will be holding the first ever exhibition of his portraits, created throughout a long, and slowly evolving career. Matisse, too, was slow to develop, and like Cézanne became one of the most influential artists of early modernism. The Royal Academy focuses on his studio practice: there is no better way to understand an artist’s work than by understanding the way he worked. Seen together these three exhibitions will highlight important developments in composition, form and colour respectively, all elements essential for the continued exploration of painting in the 20th Century.

Lecturer
Dr. Richard Stemp
Date:
Tuesday 7th November 2017
Time:
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Address
The Bulgari Hotel,
171, Knightsbridge, SW7 1DW
Cost:
£75.00
Book Tickets